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look at the questions from the pentagon. >> 1,500 rockets were fired at israel from the gaza strip in eight day of fighting. the iron dome missile system said to intercepted most of them. modern warfare game changer in the middle east. >> iron dome, performed, fair to say remarkably well. in the recent escalation. >> only 55 out of the 1,500 ended up falling. >> the u.s. taxpayers invested $275 million to help israel build and seal the iron dome which can stop incoming rockets within a 2.5-mile to 44-mile range. israel outgoing defense minister gave panetta a model as a token of gratitude. >> small iron dome. >> but the u.s. army want mrs. than a model. it wants its own antimissile system. and congress would like a favorable discount given what the u.s. has already invested in the system. >> but instead of buying from israelis who already have technology, the army may decide to start from scratch. with a u.s. con tacker. system called ai-3 to take hundreds of millions of dollars taxpayers dollars and years to develop. those who argue the u.s. military need iron dome point to casual
the pentagon. chris. >> reporter: yeah, joe. bradley manning just wrapped up his time on the stand. and he spent the entire day being cross examined by prosecutors who have been poking holes in the idea that his mistreatment was so bad that he contemplated suicide multiple times when locked up. they basically went back to a key incident in what happened to him while he was at quantico where he had to stand at parade rest naked. prosecutors went back and went back to this incident. and bradley manning had to admit that he had made a statement, something to the effect of, you know, hanging himself with his underwear. that was the reason they took off his clothes. but then further more he had a blanket over him and that he thought from what the guard said he had to drop that blanket and stand there naked. but he admitted that the guards never actually gave him an order to drop the blanket and that in subsequent days they brought his clothes with his meal tray and gave him adequate time to get dressed before standing before attention like he was called to do. so all of this, joe, is really pla
the pentagon budget was basically doubled in the last decade, and in doubling we have lost the ability to prioritize. to make hard decisions, to do tough analyses, to make trades. we also need a review of our defense strategy that makes sure that we are preparing for the threats and risks of the 21st century, not those of the past. the foundation has funded two efforts along these lines to help advance the best ideas for improving our defense strategy. earlier this year we funded a project by the stimson center which brought together 15 defense experts to examine our strategic defense priorities in some detail and how they should be reformed. today we announce the new coalition for fiscal and national security. the coalition, chaired by admiral mullen, includes senior national security defense and economic officials from both republican and democratic administrations stretching back to more than 30 years as well as leaders from the congress including some very distinguished gentlemen here today. all have served our nation with distinction, and they are joining together now to say very
's an actual human being, someone back at base remotely pulling the trigger. but the pentagon is preparing for the day when robots are capable of killing on their own. >> machines are starting to take over. >> reporter: it conjures up images of the terminator. >> i need to make myself very clear. if we uplink now, sky net will be controlling your military. >> you'll be in control of sky net, right? >> the pentagon just issued its first directive on autonomous weapons, lethal weapons with no human control to minimize failures that could lead to unintended engagements. >> that's a sterile term for me, meaning harming innocence. killing the wrong target. >> pentagon's dave ochmanek admits these weapons are still 20, 30 years away. >> that technology doesn't exist yet. so why now? >> the thought was technology is dynamic. and we would like to get out ahead of it. >> just this week they tested drones. still howing the military to develop autonomous spy planes. >> as we begin to test the possibility of planes as spy targets we want to be careful not to cross that line without high-level policy r
branches of the u.s. military. we're in constant contact with them. i've just now come from the pentagon as you are aware our minister of defense ehud barak received the highest civil honor given by the secretary of defense to any civilian, the distinguished civil service medal. and i think that stands as a symbol of the deep and multifaceted relations between our two militaries. >> we're out of time. you're a historian. he just said ehud barack, that u.s.-israeli military relations have never been better. you agree? >> i agree. >> thanks for coming in. >> thank you, wolf. >>> in the wake of the scandal surrounding general david petraeus's affair and the investigations into several other high profile generals, does the u.s. military need an ethics boot camp? and more than a decade after a deadly crash, a u.s. airline gets its day in court. many of my patients clean their dentures with toothpaste. i tell them dentures are very different to real teeth. they're about 10 times softer and may have surface pores where bacteria can grow and multiply. polident is specifically designed to clean d
there's more money to be cut in contracting at the pentagon, you don't understand what has happened at the pentagon. >> as much as i love claire, those are not the painful cuts that have to happen. we have to look at deeper reforms to entitlements. >> it amazes me how republicans can sit there and label the earned benefit programs as the cuts that have to take place when we have been in two wars that weren't paid for and big pharma that took us to where we are. i mean, i think we're missing the conversation in in country. how did we get here? molly, how did we get so far in the hole? what did we do? >> well, we spent money we didn't have, obviously. now we're looking for a way to resolve that. i think what you're hearing, too, part of the nervousness and part of the problem pr republicans is the things they are talking about aren't popular. as you've talked about a lot, there's political will to raise taxes on the wealthy. there's political will to make cuts in the pentagon. there isn't political will to cut entitlements. so the kinds of things that republicans say they want to do,
is now ordering the pentagon and other federal agencies to finalize their plans for surviving massive spending cuts. reporting live on capitol hill, danielle lee, news4. >>> in fact, the pentagon is already putting a plan in place if there is no deal by january 1st. the preliminary plan is to cut $500 billion in jobs and programs. a spokesman for the pentagon said it could force the defense department to abandon its new military strategy. it could affect spending on weapons and technology programs, and on how the military provides for the troops. >>> two fbi raids in arlington today. officers searched the seventh floor of a building in the 1900 block of fort meyer drive that houses the university of management and technology, a private university. it offers associate, bachelor and master degree programs. cardboard has been placed on the university's windows. officers also searched a town home on 21st road in arlington. the fbi confirms it did serve two search warrants. it will not say what it is looking for. >>> police in virginia think somebody wanted the money in an atm and set a bo
to classified information. now, the white house denies this. "outfront" on the story, cnn pentagon correspondent barbara starr. >> you don't think she's a little young for the hard stuff? >> washington says she's a killer. >> it's a hollywood spy thriller with as much oscar buzz as it has controversy. "zero dark 30" the story of the hunt for osama bin laden from the oscar winning powerhouse team of katherine bigelow and mark bowe recreates how it all happened, from the female cia analyst who finally figured out where he was hiding to the navy s.e.a.l.s who killed him. >> there are two narratives about the location of osama bin laden. >> reporter: the controversy? the obama administration has faced accusations it gave undeserved access to the film makers. in real life, everyone involved in the hunt for bin laden remains sworn to secrecy. but the film makers say they got firsthand accounts. they just won't say exactly how that happened. >> i think as a reporter you would understand we take protecting our sources and sort of the exact methodology of our sourcing pretty seriously, just in the same w
, pentagon sources are telling nbc news syria is preparing chemical weapons for their possible use against the syrian people in the form of aerial bombs. it is believed this specific intelligence is the reason why president obama took a hard line against syria just a few days ago, warning them there would be consequences if these weapons were used. let's begin here tonight with the very latest. on what we know, starting with our pentagon correspondent, jim miklaszewski. good evening very >> reporter: good evening, brian, u.s. officials tell us that the syrian military is poised tonight to use chemical weapons against its own people. and all it would take is the final order from syrian president assad. as the fighting grows more intense and syrian rebels close in on damascus, the syrian regime has turned very desperate. u.s. officials tell nbc news the syrian military has now loaded the precursor for bombs, that could be dropped from dozens of fighter bombers. this week, u.s. intelligence detected a flurry of activity like this one, near homs today, while u.s. officials confirm the today, w
that would bring down me or wikileaks. >> pentagon has maintained manning was held in accordance with rules regarding all maximum custody detainees. if convicted, they could go for life in prison. "outfront" tonight, chris lawrence is is at the pentagon. manning and his defense team, they have been claiming that the private was held in harsh conditions. he said quote, i'm going to die. i'm stuck inside this cage and he also said i have pretty much given up. my world had just shrunk. what else was in his testimony. >> he was very calm. dressed in his dress blues and described what it felt like in that first prison in kuwait. he said that's where he thought about suicide, then he was transferred to quantico, where he spent about five months in solitary confinement and he said that really brought him back to kuwait. he said i felt like i was being dragged back into that hole, so we heard a lot of description about what it was like for him under that sort of confinement. >> now, the military argues that keeping him was getting the circumstances. this is espionage. giving away secrets of the uni
and the pentagon. >> there was an event where operatives were involved and they did not know until they got there that the hollywood people were going to be present. so which means their identity would have been shown. >> reporter: king questions whether the military was pressured to cooperate on the film. >> what access they were told to give, some resisted, some acquiesced. >> reporter: cia and pentagon officials say no secrets were given away. >> my understanding is the hollywood people got access to cia operatives, cia locations, that they had access to navy s.e.a.l.s which they should not have had. and i can't really go beyond that other than to say that now, this investigation has gone on and it's been expanded. >> reporter: bowe says he and bigelow were very aware of national security concerns. >> we're acutely aware that there are sensitivities around this material, and i think we approached this with a lot of respect for those sensitivities. >> pretty -- i really want to see this movie. it does raise a legitimate concern about how much cooperation there is between the cia, between
, the even say the pentagon or the size of the federal debt, like if you're the biggest debtor in the world take issued certain power. are you optimistic that these can be really reversed, like 30 seconds? >> i'm very optimistic about america's future. i think we have to approach the future with confidence. we have to get our house right at home but we have to be prepared to engage with confidence abroad. we still are that shining a light on the hill that people look to. they are disappointed when we don't deliver. we are disappointed when we'd don't deliver. i think we can both at home and abroad find a way. it's not going to be simple. our government takes longer to get things done and the real economy would like. we've got to intersect but at the end of the day i'm optimistic that we can move forward. >> thank you. thank you so much. [applause] >> i'm like doctor doom, i come on stage. the eternal foot man. >> if you missed any of the previous program you can see it in its entirety at the c-span video library. go to c-span.org. we are live at the newseum here in washington for remarks fr
in guantanamo bay. there are cases all across the u.s., the pentagon is now taking a position where it is saying arbitrarily that the act of receiving information by any journalist anywhere in the world, that the pentagon says is classified and publishing some portion of it, or quote from it is espionage. it applies to journalists and also applies to people within government. >> i understand your point. but the committee to protect journalists says about ecuador -- hold on. let me ask you the question. about ecuador, president correa has turned ecuador into one of the most restrictive nations for the press. i didn't agree to talk about the surveillance state. >> well, i'm sorry. look, do you want to bring my p.a.s on? please, please. so, look. let's be honest. we have a serious situation here. whatever little things that are occurring in small countries are not of concern. >> this country -- ecuador is the country that is preventing you from being arrested the minute you walk outside the door. >> including the united states, including western europe, including france, including what was happenin
or top pentagon official, ashton carter or michelle flouryon. the special envoy to afghanistan and pakistan, mark grossman, the man that took over after richard holbrooke died. he too is stepping down from that onvy to afghanistan and pakistan. hillary clinton may be replaced by susan rice or somebody else. hillary clinton says she, herself, will not be staying on for the second term. so if you just want to focus on the war for a second, it is all change in terms of the leadership for the top officials in year 12 of america's longest war. all change for everybody in top roles there except for the president and the vice president and the 66,000 americans who are still in afghanistan fighting that war. america's war in afghanistan is not due to end this year or next year. it is not due to end until the end of the year after that, at the end of 2014. that's the date by which president obama says the u.s. combat mission in afghanistan will end. it seems important to note that that is the latest possible date by which the president says the combat mission will end. it doesn't mean i
of the conditions and that he was forced to stand naked in front of guards. the pentagon says manning was held in accordance with the rules but if convicted, he could face life in prison. "outfront" tonight, chris lawrence covering this at the pentagon. he said he was forced to stand naked in front of guards. they tried to poke some holes in that today. did they succeed? >> in some ways, erin, very much so. they got manning to admit the guards never actually ordered him to drop the blanket that was covering his body. let's back up. manning had made a crack because they had placed so many restrictions on him in confinement that if he really wanted to kill himself he could hang himself by his underwear. the guards took that seriously and that night he was stripped naked, except for a blanket. when he got up the next morning, he had to stand at parade rest. now manning had to admit today that he inferred from what the guard said that he had to drop that blanket to stand at parade rest and he admitted today they never actually said that. and, in fact, manning said that in later days, and in subseq
have no evidence that the iranian claims you cite are true. i'd refer you to the pentagon's comments this morning about the type of uav, but, again, no evidence that the claims are true. >> how do you view, though, the fact they have shot some drone -- >> again, we have no evidence to hear the claims are true. i'm not going to comment on something about which we have no evidence in its truthfulness. yes? >> jay, thanks. i want to go back to what the president asked in the interview with bloomberg. during the negotiations with speaker boehner, a year ago, he was willing to consider increasing the eligibility age for medicare recipients and slowing benefits for entitlements, and he said he was willing to look at anything that strengthens our system. can you clarify, are those prams that could strengthen the system, is that what he was signaling? >> i will say a couple things that build on and echo what the president said today and in the past. we put forward substantial and specific savings in entitlement programs. both health care entightmentments, and, you know, non-health care manda
the pentagon's ban on women serving in most combat units. they have been in combat already, especially in afghanistan, not just because of what the marines did in april or what the pentagon did in february when it opened 1400 combat related positions unavailable to female troops. that easing and bending sounds like progress. glass ceilings only ease and bend so far. more than 238,000 other military positions, mostly in the army and marine corps remain off limits to women. this week, new action was taken to change that. with the help of the aclu and the service women's action network, four service women, one of whom is my guest, filed a federal lawsuit against defense secretary, leon panetta, arguing that any pentagon ban against women in combat roles is unconstitutional. statistics say more than 1,000 women have been killed in the line of duty in iraq and afghanistan. many lacked combat training, having to learn on the fly. which leaves us with the question. why can't we have a few good women too at the taubl are two people that are asking the very question. one of them is one of the p
or bring down week key leaks. >> the pentagon has maintained that manning was held with rules for all maximum custody detainee. if convicted, he could get life in prison. chris, let me just ask you, manning and his defense team have been claiming that the private was held in harsh conditions. here's a quote from what he said today. he said, quote, i'm going to die. i'm stuck inside this cage. i had pretty much given up. my world had just shrunk. what else was in his testimony? >> well, he was very calmed. he was very composed. he was dressed in his dress blues and he described what it felt like in that first prison back in kuwait which he described as a black alond lone hole. then he was sent to quantico. we heard a lot of description about what it was like for him under that sort of confinement, erin. >> manning argues that keeping him in maximum prison was proper circumstances, this was espionage, something that could get the death penalty, even though they are not going for that. did they make that case? >> they are. they say, look, at the time, he was a maximum security detainee w
, but the pentagon, the joint chiefs, a lot of republican defense hawks, a lot of the defense contractors say not only would the level of cuts in the automatic sequester portion that goes to defense be harmful to national security, but that it would be a huge hit on the economy because there's so many jobs involved. so my sense is people don't want to talk about that because it would raise a lot of alarms but in some ways is more serious than the tax cuts even though they don't all occur at once. it would sends us down a difficult path. it's already created a lot of uncertainty in the defense world. >> some of the more liberal opponents of the deal on the democratic left, would not mind seeing these defense cuts. >> just as they wouldn't mind in some cases on the left seeing the tax increase on everybody so that they can force a vote to lower the rates back only for those americans outside the top 2%, you're right. a lot of liberals would like to see that. this is why the president has leverage. he has some leverage off of his victory in the campaign, but he's got a lot of leverage off of the
. jennifer griffin is live from the pentagon. could the iron dome protect u.s. bases overseas for instance, jennifer? >> reporter: it probably could. the army has a system but it works differently shooting multiple round of bullets rather than missiles at incoming mortars and rockets. missile defense can be very expensive. $90,000 per rocket for instance fired by the iron dome system. yesterday at the pentagon defense secretary panetta received from the defense minister of israel a mold of a tamir missile, part ever the iron dome system that worked so well during the gaza conflict. the u.s. army is investigating buying an iron dome-type system. we already invested $270 million in sealing the dome. they sealed it in record time, three years, despite many skeptics in israel as well as in the pentagon, jon. jon: if we helped fund the system, and our technology, presumably is part of it, why not just buy an iron dome from israel complete? >> reporter: it's a good question. we've learned that raytheon, an antimissile defense manufacturer has proposed something called battle dome back in novembe
in session. the fight to allow women to fight in combat roles. the pentagon says it cannot comment on the current case and while the says it is working on a solution, some of the women filing the lawsuit says that doesn't change the discrimination they feel they suffered so far. >> my gender has never been a factor in accomplishing my unit's mission. >> i would be assigned positions based on my gender rather than my qualifycation or accomplishments. >> it doesn't make sense for the military. megyn: do they have a case? jonna spilbor ... jonna they can serve in combat-related roles. two of the women have purple hearts for flying helicopters. but there are hundreds of thousands of jobs potentially available to men that are not available to women in the military and they say it's a discrimination issue. >> i think they are right. kudos to them for being so brave. being on the battlefield there is no bigger job for anybody in the military. why not treat this like any other title 7 case. they are women. you can't say because you are a woman you can't do something that a man can do unles
. it doesn't include the budget consequences. $55 billion would be cut from the pentagon and another $55 billion slashed from domestic programs. an estimated 2 million jobs could be lost pushing the economy back into a recession adding to the misery to those facing tough times by ending jobless benefits for the long term unemployed. steve is live in washington. where do we stand at this point? >> reporter: two sides did do something today. they appeared on the sunday talk shows but they haven't negotiated an actual deal. john boehner blasted the white house plan which was put forward last week. boehner says the president essentially wasted the last three weeks since the election with nonsense. >> the president is asking for $1.6 trillion worth of new revenue over ten years, twice as much as he been asking for in public. stimulus spending that exceeded the amount of new cuts he was willing to consider. it was not a serious offer. >> reporter: and boehner says he was flabbergasted when he was given the proposal. >> heather: and democrats are defending themselves? >> treasury-secretary tim
anywhere in the world that the pentagon says is classified is spying and that is something that is plies to journalists and also to government. but they say about ecuador hold on. in less than five years. >> as we agreed -- >> the issue is the surveillance state. we are in a situation -- >> i didn't agree to talk about the surveillance state. >> i'm sorry. look, do you want to bring my pa's on? >> please please. >> so look, let's be honest. we have a serious situation here. whatever little things are occurring in this country are not our concern. >> it is the country that is preventing you from being arrested the moment you walk outside the door. >> including western europe and the former libya. we have researched it. we have documented it. >> then why will you not talk about ecuador? >> because it is insignificant. >> but it is the country that is enabling you to not be arrested. >> it is people have been generous to me. >> yes. >> but it is not a significant world player. >> south america and the developments that are happening there are interesting and significant and it is growing in
the pentagon at all. if asked, do you think john kerry turns down that offer? >> i doubt that he would turn down that offer. everything that we're hearing is that he would be eager to serve in a second term administration. it would be being secretary of defense is one of the highest profile positions. and of course if somehow susan rice falters or isn't nominated, john kerry is there as the backup. and i will say this during the whole rice kerr flufl, john kerry has been a good soldier. he's even backed up susan rice. and he said and done all the right things. i wouldn't be surprised if the white house has also noticed that. >> it really does have to be an awkward position. all right. mark murray, thank you, sir. >>> we're watching developments in egypt, as well, where tens of thousands of protesters have been jamming cairo's tahrir square for hours now. they denouncing president morsi and that draft constitution his islamic allies approved early today. james maceda joining me live. it appears reminiscent of the scene two years ago. >> reporter: you're right. and i want to point out somethi
at the pentagon. the general counsel of the defense department, jay johnson, speaking today at oxford university in britain broaching a subject that nobody at a high level of government has been willing to officially broach since 9/11. >> how will this conflict end? it is an unconventional conflict against an unconventional enemy and will not end in conventional terms. we cannot, and should not, expect al qaeda and. its associated forces to all surrender, all lay down their weapons in an old field or to sign a peace treaty with us. they are terrorist organizations. nor can we capture or kill every last terrorist who claims an affiliation with al qaeda. i can offer no prediction about when this conflict will end. or whether we are as winston churchill once described it near the "beginning of the end." on the present course, i do believe, there will be a tipping point. a tipping point at which so many of the leaders and operatives of al qaeda and its affiliates have been killed or captured and the group is no longer able to attempt or launch a strategic attack against the united states. such that
, the pentagon said they made a big push for that and there is prediction military vote was down last month the final number should be in this coming week. >> north carolina -- "voting is one of the greatest privileges we have in our country and people choose to dishonor the electorate and themselves committing fraud leapt voting. i believe it's my duty to report it." thank you, michael, it's our duty to investigate it. as always, here is our address. voterfraud@foxnews.com. we are staying on this beat. >> jamie: those are incredible comments from folks out there. thank you, eric. well, we made it through the height of the holiday shopping season. soon you will get your gift. but sometimes family and friends miss the mark. today i want to give you tips for returning the gifts that weren't quite right. kristen benz is retall analyst of pmv venture group. welcome. >> hi. >> jamie: i manual with the economy the way it is, the rules could be even tighter this year on returns. do you expect that? >> absolutely. especially with a pending fiscal cliff ahead of us you will see a lot of buyer's rem
landed on iranian territory. either way the new drone is said to be far less sophisticated. the pentagon points out several countries used the scan eagle so theoretically it could be almost anybody's. david lee miller is live in jerusalem. david lee? >> that's right, shepard, the u.s. navy says two of iran's neighbors the uae the united arab emirates as well as kuwait have scan eagle drones. it's very possible the drone that iran is claiming to have in its possession could have come from somewhere in the neighborhood. so, as of now at this hour, there is still a mystery as to where this drone came from. the u.s. says that all its drones in the region have been accounted for. in the past year they have been lost in the water. it happened as early as october. it came apart on impact as it is designed to do it sank. even if iran has the boeing made drone it is not a big security concern. this particular drone was developed originally to keep an eye on fishing boat to make sure they were capturing tuna and not dolphins. it's a flying camera and transmitter. behalf the iranians have they do w
is ordering the pentagon and other federal agencies to finalize their plan for surviving massive spending cuts. danielle lee, news4. >>> the house has now approved a bill giving former presidents and their wives secret service protection for life. under current law, secret service protection lasts only ten years after a president leaves office. supporters argue the change is necessary because of terrorist threats, and the comparative youth of recent presidents. the bill now goes to the u.s. senate. >>> my tweet has been posted. that's what i'm talking about. >> if you send a tweet to the white house twitter account, you might get an answer back from the president himself. the white house released this video of the president answering tweets from americans about the ongoing fiscal cliff negotiations. the white house started a hash tag, my 2 k which refers to the $2,000 the average middle class american will pay in taxes if a deal is not reached. >>> that's how he gets it done, like the rest of us, huh? >> doing it himself. >>> a health scare for a former child star. a stroke that landed frankie
to perhaps pentagon spending. i'm looking at a graph that shows pentagon-related spending to be 60% of the budget. we need to change the focus away from the social safety net. all of the money goes back into the economy and perhaps some of the fat cats in virginia and other places that make lots and lots of money on defense spending. >> bill: got it, tony. >> tony, i just saw a graph. that senator manchin showed me yesterday. that showed that the troops -- we've actually -- we actually have the same number of troops we've had in the last few years. the huge increase in pentagon spending is consultants and is outside contractors. and even he was saying wait a second, we have to actually look at this. we have to look -- that's why the balance issue becomes so important. so instead of saying on the education spending, i can tell you what that money goes for. that money goes for head start slots. that money goes for making sure that in the kids who have gotten the worst end of the stick in the recession they get -- feder
with questions about unprecedented and some inappropriate access to classified information. our pentagon correspondent barbara starr spoke to the filmmakers. >> don't think she's a little young for the hard stuff? >> washington says she's a killer. >> it's a hollywood spy thriller with as much oscar buzz as it has controversy. "zero dark thirty," the story of the hunt for osama bin laden, from the oscar-winning powerhouse team of katherine big ga lo and mark bo, recreates how it all happened from the female cia analyst who finally figured out where he was hiding to the navy s.e.a.l.s who killed him. >> there are two narratives about the location of osama bin laden. >> reporter: the controversy? the obama administration has faced accusations it gave undeserved access to the filmmakers. in real life, everyone involved in the hunt for bin laden remains sworn to secrecy. but the filmmakers say they got firsthand accounts. they just won't say exactly how that happened. >> i think as a reporter you would understand we take prot t protecting our sources and sort of the exact methodology of our
popular. if they want more entitlement cuts, more discretionary spending cuts, if they want pentagon cuts, the president wants them to specify them. and this offer is intended in part to say here's my math. here's the level of deficit reduction i can reach. if you think you can reach the same or more with more spending cuts, you go first and name them. >> yeah. >> so richard, we have everybody playing chicken for the most part. it's kabuki. you show your spending cuts and then i'll show mine. >> right. it failed before when the president was negotiating against himself. look, i'm going to come back. $400 billion of medicare cuts is exactly what you would want democrats to do if you want them to start dealing with entitlements. what are we talking about when we say democrats need to deal with entitlements? principally, it's medicare. so that's a huge down payment right there. you can say, well, i don't really believe they're possible, but that's a real proposal. what you're asking for in terms of the politics is that the president somehow solves john boehner's problems with his own caucus.
this morning that the pentagon is looking to wrap up the spy network overseas. >> clayton: peter doocy live from d.c. with the details on this. >> reporter: good morning, clayton. the new spy agency called the dcs, defense clandestine agency and the intelligence collectors are taking orders directly from the department of defense, they'll have 1600 of the collectors according to the washington post, there are already around 500 case officers at the defense intelligence agency. gathers tension for the military by 2018. they'll have about a thousand and that number will keep growing as the defense intelligence agency transitions over to the new dcs spies will be trained by the cia, but unlike the cia, the dcs is not going to be able to do anything, but gath gather intelligence, political sabotage and drone strikes continue to be cia operations and of dcs, focus on i.d.ing targets. and in recent months, those priorities have been keeping tabs on problem areas like africa, iran, north korea and even the strengthening military in china. this was signed off on by the defense secretary, leon pane
with the pentagon, providing energy to the u.s. military. >>> defense secretary leon panetta broke ground at a new educational center at the vietnam veterans memorial in washington. the center will it tells the stories of the 58,000 soldiers who died in the vietnam war. the center will honor fallen soldiers from the wars in iraq and afghanistan. >>> prince william and catherine middleton greeted by hundreds of fans as they arrived in cambridge. their first visit since being given their titles of duke and duchess of cambridge. they plan to tour the city and meet with cambridge university students during their visit. >>> senate majority leader harry reid says raising the debt limit has to be part of any package. john tester a members of the banking committee. newly re-elected. >> thanks, andrea. >> thanks very much for being with us. you're from one of the reddest of red states, you squeaked through. congratulations on that victory. what does it now bring you right into the middle of these negotiations and a tough vote. what are the people back home telling you? >> the people back home have been tel
for you? >> no. the pentagon i have to say was fairly cooperative. there were different levels of competence when it came to specific public affairs officials. generally speaking, they were cooperative. but they want you to go through them and i didn't. i generally just found the troops on my own and they put me in touch with their fellow troops. it's interesting, when you were talking about the afghan soldiers, this something i haven't talked about in other interviews. one of the things that's interesting, as i went through the life of this one combat outpost from 2006 to when it's overrun in 2009, is the different levels of competence when it came to the afghan soldiers. unfortunately for the u.s. in that region, in regional command east, eastern afghanistan in 2009, it was one of the worst battalions of afghan soldiers ever. when it was attacked, when combat outpost keating was attacked, most of them ran away or hid or when through the american bar racks stealing ipods and computers. it's no surprise because actually a few months before at another combat outpost a similar th
held. that arrest back in 2010 medical now has been long and painful, they say. cnn's pentagon correspondent chris lawrence joins me now. what exactly does bradley manning hi that the government should do and why does he think that perhaps his treatment should lead to his release before any kind of trial. >> to your first question, they would like some of the charges to be thrown out. that's not likely. as a backup, they would like to see some credit for some of that mistreatment applied to whatever sentence he may get if found guilty or if he pleads. what he is saying is sort of really giving us our first real description from him of what he has gone through personally. he says when he talked about that first prison where he spent a couple of months in kuwait, he said it was like a dark, lonely hole. he said i thought i was going to die in that cage. then he was transferred to qauntico where he says it reminded him of that cage in kuwait. he basically said that he spent about 23 hours of the day by himself not seeing anyone else. he wasn't allowed to sleep during the day. at o
. out front tonight, barbara starr, pentagon correspondent. this is a new front. drones themselves have changed the entire way this country will fight war forevermore but let's start with the bioswimmer. what can it do? >> reporter: well, this is a very interesting project that was actually funded by the department of homeland security to basically -- it takes the shape of a tuna because tuna can maneuver in the water, they can get into small places, and the idea is if you could put sensors on this, cameras, acoustics, radar, whatever, you could put this kind of device into u.s. bombers, maybe to go through shipwrecks, maybe to go through underground debris, maybe just to keep watch for potential terrorist attacks on u.s. ports. the whole idea with all of these programs is that nature really is, you know, the best way. there's a good lesson to be learned here. these are devices that can move as they do in nature like a tuna. tuna is pretty good at getting through the tight spots under water. >> when you think about just under water, simple things, 90% of the world's goods go by ship. yo
. split between defense and domestic programs. a pentagon official says is he cautiously optimistic that the congress and the white house will come up with a deal to avoid the cliffs. one republic senator says he is more worried than ever. it's the top story at the bottom of the hour. mike emanuel is on it this evening. the idea was that these cuts would be so painful that this thing would be so horrible. that this would throw us into such a mess that there is no way these loons on capitol hill would let this happen. but lo and behold. >> exactly, shep. certainly 2012 campaign politics did not help congress and the white house find alternatives to these cuts. today a top republic senator told me time is running out. >> i'm more worried about the sequester now than ever because it seems to be overshadowed by discussions over going off the fiscal cliff which is a separate but related matter. a combination of those two things both huge tax increase and a $1.2 trillion in cuts will put us in a recession. defense and domestic cuts could be avoided if a grand bargain is struck to avoid th
to run the pentagon, that makes for a very interesting senate race in the state of massachusetts, once again. >> maybe, maybe not. what people keep forgetting in all of this is that the massachusetts legislature is run by democrats who could always just change the law back so that there's not a special election and it becomes an appointment, again. yes, some dominos falling in massachusetts if senator kerry gets that post, particularly if there is an election, which is the state of the law right now. scott brown expected to run for it and about as strong a republican as you can get in the state of massachusetts. >> molly ball, thank you so much. lynn sweet, one of my favorite ladies. lynn, i did not get to ask you about your jesse jackson, but i would encourage folks to read on what you wrote over gesjesse jackson jr. over the past week or so. some very insightful reporting. >>> 31 days out to the fiscal cliff. we will go live to see what the president is saying to house leaders and whether that will keep us any further away from the edge. >>> also, how did the president capture the la
who serve and sacrifice. this week, the pentagon released the names of two service members killed in afghanistan. the names of two service members killed in afghanistan. >>> and when we come back, this question, of all of the american presidents, who would you like to interview? made a commitment to the gulf. bp has paid over twenty-three billion dollars to help those affected and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open, and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. and bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. music is a universal language. but when i was in an accident... i was worried the health care system spoke a language all its own with unitedhealthcare, i got help that fit my life. information on my phone. connection to doctors who get where i'm from. and tools to estimate what my care may cost. so i never missed a beat. we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70
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